Emergencies and new conflicts leave refugees hungry
"Food saves lives. It helps us be productive citizens, and is essential to the development of our children," said Jesuit Refugee Service International Director Peter Balleis S.J. highlighting World Food Day today. "That is why we urgently need … to create more opportunities for the forcibly displaced to build sustainable livelihoods." 

Emergencies and new conflicts leave refugees hungry

"Food saves lives. It helps us be productive citizens, and is essential to the development of our children," said Jesuit Refugee Service International Director Peter Balleis S.J. highlighting World Food Day today. "That is why we urgently need … to create more opportunities for the forcibly displaced to build sustainable livelihoods." 

Colombia: heed the victims of conflict
In response to ongoing peace talks in Colombia, Jesuit Refugee Service urges the negotiating parties to attend the needs of those affected by the conflict. JRS calls for assistance for victims, reparations, solutions to the displacement and preventative measures. JRS urges receiving states to welcome refugees and offer them protection, not forcibly return them to Colombia.

Colombia: heed the victims of conflict

In response to ongoing peace talks in Colombia, Jesuit Refugee Service urges the negotiating parties to attend the needs of those affected by the conflict. JRS calls for assistance for victims, reparations, solutions to the displacement and preventative measures. JRS urges receiving states to welcome refugees and offer them protection, not forcibly return them to Colombia.

Syria: between fear of violence and the struggle to survive
The humanitarian crisis in two of the three principle cities in Syria has deteriorated dramatically in the last two months, according to Jesuit Refugee Service teams on the ground. “The situation in Damascus is very unpredictable at the moment, especially in the areas where we have our centers. We do our best to assist those in need, but it is a very precarious situation,” said Nawras Sammour S.J., Regional Director of JRS Middle East and North Africa.

Syria: between fear of violence and the struggle to survive

The humanitarian crisis in two of the three principle cities in Syria has deteriorated dramatically in the last two months, according to Jesuit Refugee Service teams on the ground. “The situation in Damascus is very unpredictable at the moment, especially in the areas where we have our centers. We do our best to assist those in need, but it is a very precarious situation,” said Nawras Sammour S.J., Regional Director of JRS Middle East and North Africa.

Interviews conducted with migrants stranded in southern Italy expose the failure of European reception systems to uphold principles of human dignity, hospitality and fairness, according to the findings of a new report by Jesuit Refugee Service. “My bones hurt. I still have back pains from sleeping on the street. I slept on cardboard with no blanket or sheets,” says Kofi, whose wife and two children drowned as they attempted to join him in Europe.

Interviews conducted with migrants stranded in southern Italy expose the failure of European reception systems to uphold principles of human dignity, hospitality and fairness, according to the findings of a new report by Jesuit Refugee Service. “My bones hurt. I still have back pains from sleeping on the street. I slept on cardboard with no blanket or sheets,” says Kofi, whose wife and two children drowned as they attempted to join him in Europe.

A year after the tragic death of nearly 400 forced migrants — men, women, children — off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa, tens of thousands of lives have been saved. The details of how close the victims were to the coast spurred the Italian government to act. Proof, if any was needed, of how much can be done when states priories life above border security.

A year after the tragic death of nearly 400 forced migrants — men, women, children — off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa, tens of thousands of lives have been saved. The details of how close the victims were to the coast spurred the Italian government to act. Proof, if any was needed, of how much can be done when states priories life above border security.

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Central African Republic: A Transition at Risk | Crisis Group
On 26 September 2014, the United Nations Secretary-General convened a high-level meeting on the Central African Republic. The meeting aimed to identify the next steps for the restoration of peace and stability in the country, following the signing of the Brazzaville Cessation of Hostilities agreement on 23 July, the appointment of a new transitional government on 24 August and the transfer of authority from the African-led International Support Mission to the Central African Republic (MISCA) to the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) on 15 September. The meeting was attended by CAR’s President Catherine Samba-Panza and representatives of the five Permanent Members of the Security Council, regional states, regional organisations and international financial institutions. The International Crisis Group sent the following letter to the participants ahead of the meeting.
Letter to the Participants of the High-Level Meeting on the Central African Republic | 26 September 2014
Excellencies,
The Central African Republic’s seven-month-old transition is at risk. The country’s leaders and partners meeting in the special high-level event at the UN General Assembly on 26 September 2014 should redouble efforts to put it back on track.
The July Brazzaville summit, which aimed to end CAR’s de-facto partition, has not stopped the fighting. The main armed groups are in disarray, lack clear leadership, seek to expand their areas of control and pursue banditry as much as politics. They should be contained to allow space for the political process. Political elites in Bangui are divided. The government has become weaker, faces growing popular discontent and has been accused of favouritism, with the choice of a new Prime Minister criticised. Despite a display of unanimity, CAR’s neighbours pursue competing and often ambiguous strategies in the country.
FULL LETTER (In Pursuit of Peace - Crisis Group Blog)
Photo: UN Photo/Cia Pak

crisisgroup:

Central African Republic: A Transition at Risk | Crisis Group

On 26 September 2014, the United Nations Secretary-General convened a high-level meeting on the Central African Republic. The meeting aimed to identify the next steps for the restoration of peace and stability in the country, following the signing of the Brazzaville Cessation of Hostilities agreement on 23 July, the appointment of a new transitional government on 24 August and the transfer of authority from the African-led International Support Mission to the Central African Republic (MISCA) to the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) on 15 September. The meeting was attended by CAR’s President Catherine Samba-Panza and representatives of the five Permanent Members of the Security Council, regional states, regional organisations and international financial institutions. The International Crisis Group sent the following letter to the participants ahead of the meeting.

Letter to the Participants of the High-Level Meeting on the Central African Republic | 26 September 2014

Excellencies,

The Central African Republic’s seven-month-old transition is at risk. The country’s leaders and partners meeting in the special high-level event at the UN General Assembly on 26 September 2014 should redouble efforts to put it back on track.

The July Brazzaville summit, which aimed to end CAR’s de-facto partition, has not stopped the fighting. The main armed groups are in disarray, lack clear leadership, seek to expand their areas of control and pursue banditry as much as politics. They should be contained to allow space for the political process. Political elites in Bangui are divided. The government has become weaker, faces growing popular discontent and has been accused of favouritism, with the choice of a new Prime Minister criticised. Despite a display of unanimity, CAR’s neighbours pursue competing and often ambiguous strategies in the country.

FULL LETTER (In Pursuit of Peace - Crisis Group Blog)

Photo: UN Photo/Cia Pak

Pope Francis urges ‘globalization of charity and cooperation’ to aid migrants and refugees
“Jesus Christ is always waiting to be recognized in migrants and refugees, in displaced persons and in exiles, and through them he calls us to share our resources, and occasionally to give up something of our acquired riches,” writes Pope Francis ahead of January’s World Day of Refugees and Migrants.

Pope Francis urges ‘globalization of charity and cooperation’ to aid migrants and refugees

“Jesus Christ is always waiting to be recognized in migrants and refugees, in displaced persons and in exiles, and through them he calls us to share our resources, and occasionally to give up something of our acquired riches,” writes Pope Francis ahead of January’s World Day of Refugees and Migrants.